Dr. Mayr Inducted as Fellow of American Society for Radiation Oncology

April 05, 2012
Dr Mayr Inducted as Fellow of American Society for Radiation Oncology

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Dr. Nina A. Mayr, professor of radiation oncology at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, has been inducted as a Fellow of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (FASTRO).

"The ASTRO Fellows program was created to honor and recognize the best and the brightest in the field of radiation oncology," said Dr. Leonard Gunderson, ASTRO immediate past president, emeritus professor and consultant in radiation oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. "ASTRO Fellows are examples of those who have gone above and beyond in their efforts to help the specialty, the Society and the patients we all work so hard to cure."

Members of ASTRO are eligible to be awarded Fellowship status if they have given significant service to ASTRO and made outstanding contributions to the field of radiation oncology in research, patient care, education and leadership/service.

Mayr received the Fellow award for her distinguished contributions in research and education and her transformational leadership at two institutions. "The FASTRO award is a wonderful recognition that I deeply appreciate – but more than that, it is a constant reminder to me of our commitment and perseverance to improve the care of cancer patients," says Mayr. "I have been fortunate to be part of formidable progress in our field, but much remains to be accomplished to advance radiation oncology care here and around the world."

She currently serves on ASTRO's Scientific Committee and as the Chair of ASTRO's International Education Subcommittee. Her research and scholarly interests focus on gynecologic and breast radiation oncology, lung cancer, cancer metastases, advanced radiation therapy techniques. She is also researching ways to predict pending treatment failure as early as days or weeks into treatment, thus providing a second chance at cure. Her clinical interests include imaging-guided radiation therapy and brachytherapy, functional/molecular tumor imaging, women's cancers, lung cancer and neuroradiation oncology.

ASTRO is the largest radiation oncology society in the world, with more than 10,000 members who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapy. As the leading organization in radiation oncology, biology and physics, the Society is dedicated to improving patient care through education, clinical practice, advancement of science and advocacy.

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only seven centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials. The NCI recently rated Ohio State's cancer program as "exceptional," the highest rating given by NCI survey teams. As the cancer program's 210-bed adult patient-care component, The James is a "Top Hospital" as named by the Leapfrog Group and one of the top 20 cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

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Click here for a high-quality photograph of Dr. Nina Mayr.

Contact: Eileen Scahill, Medical Center Public Affairs and Media Relations, 614-293-3737, or Eileen.Scahill@osumc.edu

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