Researchers Target HER1 Receptor for Peptide Cancer Vaccine, Therapeutic Agents

July 24, 2013
Researchers Target HER1 Receptor for Peptide Cancer Vaccine Therapeutic Agents Kaumya Pravin
  • Small proteins called peptides offer potentially safer, more effective and less costly alternatives to antibody-based drugs now used to treat many cancers.
  • This study identifies two regions on an important receptor molecule on cancer cells to which peptide-based cancer vaccines and drugs can attach (i.e., bind).
  • The findings lay the ground work for new cancer vaccines and drugs that target the HER1 receptor in tumors of the breast, lung, colon and head and neck.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Small proteins called peptides that consist of 10 to 50 amino acids are being studied as cancer vaccines and as possibly safer, more effective and less costly alternatives to the monoclonal-antibody-based drugs and small-molecule inhibitors now used to treat many malignancies.

Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) have identified two regions on the HER1/EGFR receptor, a protein important for cancer-cell growth and metastasis, and for poor patient survival, as targets for peptide agents.

The receptor molecules extend bristle-like from the surface of cancer cells in abnormally high numbers. It is activated by growth factors in the blood and released by other cells in the tumor, stimulating tumor growth.

“Our findings could lead to novel peptide vaccines and mimetic inhibitors that target HER1 in tumors of the breast, lung, colon and head and neck, and that overcome many of the significant shortcomings of antibody-based drugs such as cetuximab,” says principal investigator Pravin Kaumaya, PhD, director of the division of vaccine development at the OSUCCC – James.

“Such peptide agents might enable the development of combination immunotherapies using either HER2 vaccines or VEGF therapy that avoid the mechanisms of resistance or secondary treatment failures sometimes experienced with antibody treatment,” says Kaumaya, who is also professor of obstetrics and gynecology, of molecular and cellular biochemistry, and of microbiology at Ohio State.

The study is published in the Journal of Immunology.

HER1 is a member of the epithelial growth factor (EGF) family of cell-surface receptors, which includes the HER2 receptor. These receptors play a central role in the development of a variety of human cancers, including certain breast cancers, lung cancer, colorectal and head and neck cancers.

Kaumaya and his colleagues evaluated three sequences of peptides to determine which were the most specific and immunogenic (i.e., raised the strongest immune response in test animals), and therefore were best suited for use as vaccines or therapeutics. The three sequences, or epitopes, were based on the site of contact between HER1 and the growth factor that normally binds with it, epithelial growth factor (EGF).

Key technical findings included:

  • Two of the sequences (382–410 and 418–435) were identified as best for use as cancer therapy or a cancer vaccine;
  • The 382–410 epitope overlaps the binding site of cetuximab, an antibody agent that inhibits HER1 binding; however, the 418–435 epitope significantly inhibited tumor growth in transplantable breast and lung cancer models;
  • The vaccine constructs were highly immunogenic and established immunological memory in a rabbit model.

“Overall,” Kaumaya says, “our results show that the 418–435 epitope has great potential for use as a vaccine or treatment option for HER1-expressing cancers.”

Funding from the NIH/National Cancer Institute (grant CA084356) supported this research.

Other Ohio State researchers involved in this study were Kevin Chu Foy, Ruthie M. Wygle, Megan J. Miller, Jay P. Overholser and Tanios Bekaii-Saab.

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials. The NCI recently rated Ohio State’s cancer program as “exceptional,” the highest rating given by NCI survey teams. As the cancer program’s 228-bed adult patient-care component, The James is a “Top Hospital” as named by the Leapfrog Group and one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S.News & World Report.

###

A high quality JPEG of Pravin Kaumaya, PhD, is available here.

Contact: Darrell E. Ward, Wexner Medical Center Public Affairs and Media Relations, 614-293-3737, or Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu

Contact Media Staff

Amanda Harper

Director of Media Relations


614-685-5420 (direct)


614-293-3737 (main)


Amanda.Harper2@osumc.edu


Media staff are available by calling 614-293-3737 Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

 

If after hours, please call 614-293-8000 (ask the operator to page the hospital administrative manager).

Latest News

Elli's Story

Elli, 19 and a freshman pre-med student at Ohio State, was a sophomore in high school when she began experiencing unexplained episodes of light-headedness. Read her story.

Young Woman Writes Letter of Gratitude to Cancer

Christie Currie, 18, of Upper Arlington, is gearing up to begin her undergraduate studies at Miami University in the fall. Throughout her youth, she has had to overcome one great challenge—beating cancer.

Pelotonia Funds Awarded by Ohio State Cancer Program to Seven Research Teams for Innovative Studies

Seven groups of cancer researchers have received a funding boost to investigate innovative scientific ideas thanks to funds generated through Pelotonia, a grassroots cycling movement established in 2009...