January Physician of the Month: Floor Backes

More than just a doctor, Floor Backes is a partner for her patients throughout their cancer journeys. Meet January’s Physician of the Month. Read More

More than just a doctor, Floor Backes is a partner for her patients throughout their cancer journeys. Meet January’s Physician of the Month. Read More

James Researchers Identify Certain Cancers with 'BRCA-like' Gene Mutations

Researchers at The James are studying how some gene mutations can mimic — and even influence — other gene behaviors in some gynecologic cancers, which could be key for providing targeted therapies. Read More

Researchers at The James are studying how some gene mutations can mimic — and even influence — other gene behaviors in some gynecologic cancers, which could be key for providing targeted therapies to patients. Read More

Ovarian Cancer & the Lynch Syndrome Link

Can medical experts really predict if a woman will get ovarian or uterine/endometrial cancer? In many cases, yes – they really can. Read More

Can medical experts really predict if a woman will get ovarian or uterine/endometrial cancer? In many cases, yes – they really can. An inherited genetic condition called Lynch syndrome is actually the most common cause of hereditary uterine cancer, and it also increases the risk of ovarian cancer. The syndrome is passed down from generation to generation, predisposing these women not only to gynecologic cancers, but to colon and other cancers as well. Read More

Ovarian Cancer National Trial: Could a Virus Prevent Cancer Recurrence?

For some women, it might be one virus well worth having. In fact, while it causes cold- or flu-like symptoms, the reovirus may help save lives... Read More

For some women, it might be one virus well worth having. In fact, while it causes cold- or flu-like symptoms, the reovirus may help save lives. And that’s what the gynecologic oncology research experts at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) mean to find out. Read More

There Is No Routine Cancer

Just as no two people are exactly the same, neither are their cancers. Each patient’s cancer is fueled by different elements that help cancer cells develop, survive, invade and grow. Read More

Just as no two people are exactly the same, neither are their cancers. Each patient’s cancer is fueled by different elements that help cancer cells develop, survive, invade and grow. These elements – or genetic differences – are the reason there is no routine cancer. Researchers and oncologists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) are using genomic sequencing to study the unique genetic makeup of each patient's cancer. Read More

Hope’s Boutique Manager Will Carry Fond Memories Into Retirement

When Vera Garofalo started visiting corporate and community partners in the early 1990s to spread the word about the importance of mammograms, she didn’t utter the words “breast cancer.” Read More

When Vera Garofalo started visiting corporate and community partners in the early 1990s to spread the word about the importance of mammograms, she didn’t utter the words “breast cancer.” It was a different time, she recalls, a time when people didn’t talk easily about cancer – long before today’s pink ribbon awareness campaign and federal guidelines on screenings. That things have changed becomes quickly evident to anyone watching Garofalo welcome customers to Hope's Boutique, a full-service, nonprofit retail shop that caters to women with cancer. Read More

What is Cervical Cancer? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Cancer of the cervix was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. Fortunately, an increase in screening and related research has helped reduce the death rate. Read More

Cancer of the cervix was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. Fortunately, an increase in screening and related research has helped reduce the death rate by almost 70 percent. Check out the infographic below for more information on cervical cancer incidence, risk and screening based on research from experts at the OSUCCC – James. Read More

New Study Recommends Ovary Removal for Women With BRCA Mutations

A new study published in JCO found that women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations who protectively had their ovaries removed reduced their risk of ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers. Read More

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found that women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations who protectively had their ovaries removed (oophorectomy) reduced their risk of ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer by 80 percent and their overall risk of death by 77 percent. Investigators at the OSUCCC – James, including co-author and licensed genetic counselor Leigha Senter, MS, LGC, collaborated on this study, which has been offered to patients with genetic mutations at the OSUCCC - James since 2001. Read More