Lynch Syndrome: The Cancer Connection Uncovered [INFOGRAPHIC]

Researchers at the OSUCCC – James discovered just how big of an impact genetic variations can have on an individual’s cancer detection, prevention, treatment and cure. Read More

There is no routine cancer, and researchers at the OSUCCC – James discovered just how big of an impact genetic variations can have on an individual’s cancer detection, prevention, treatment and cure when they found a direct relationship between the presence of Lynch syndrome and colorectal cancer in patients. This discovery led to a pioneering of screening efforts to increase years of life for those affected with LS. Read More

Pelotonia: United To Chase Cancer Down

After beginning in 2009, Pelotonia has become an annual, nationally acclaimed cycling experience that draws together thousands of riders, volunteers, patients, families and friends who want to end cancer. Read More

After beginning in 2009 as a grassroots bike tour to raise money for innovative and life-saving cancer research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James), Pelotonia has become an annual, nationally acclaimed cycling experience that draws together thousands of riders, volunteers, patients, families and friends who want to stamp out cancer forever. Read More

Ovarian Cancer & the Lynch Syndrome Link

Can medical experts really predict if a woman will get ovarian or uterine/endometrial cancer? In many cases, yes – they really can. Read More

Can medical experts really predict if a woman will get ovarian or uterine/endometrial cancer? In many cases, yes – they really can. An inherited genetic condition called Lynch syndrome is actually the most common cause of hereditary uterine cancer, and it also increases the risk of ovarian cancer. The syndrome is passed down from generation to generation, predisposing these women not only to gynecologic cancers, but to colon and other cancers as well. Read More

There Is No Routine Cancer

Just as no two people are exactly the same, neither are their cancers. Each patient’s cancer is fueled by different elements that help cancer cells develop, survive, invade and grow. Read More

Just as no two people are exactly the same, neither are their cancers. Each patient’s cancer is fueled by different elements that help cancer cells develop, survive, invade and grow. These elements – or genetic differences – are the reason there is no routine cancer. Researchers and oncologists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) are using genomic sequencing to study the unique genetic makeup of each patient's cancer. Read More

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cancer Risk

Cancer risk can be impacted by a number of things, including family history, lifestyle choices and pre-existing health conditions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Read More

Cancer risk can be impacted by a number of things, including family history, lifestyle choices and pre-existing health conditions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD encompasses two disorders: ulcerative colitis, which affects the large intestine, and Crohn’s Disease, which can affect various areas of the digestive tract. Both disorders result in repetitive cycles of pain, nausea or diarrhea and constipation. Read More

Cancer's Next Great Hope

Call it cancer’s thumbprint. It’s the indelible, one-of-a-kind signature found in the DNA of every cancer patient. Read More

Call it cancer’s thumbprint. It’s the indelible, one-of-a-kind signature found in the DNA of every cancer patient. And it’s not only the catalyst to unlocking personalized treatment options and improved outcomes, but it’s also the key to predicting the risk of getting certain cancers altogether. Read More