The nationally renowned medical research experts at the OSUCCC – James are currently studying a number of different ways to detect hemophilia earlier so that treatment can begin as soon as possible. 

One of the best ways to detect hemophilia at the earliest possible point — when options for treatment are best — is to see a medical expert at the first sign of symptoms.

Additionally, women who have hemophilia have a high likelihood of passing the disorder on to their children, so they may want to consider genetic testing and counseling

(Source: National Institutes of Health)

If you’ve been diagnosed with hemophilia, would like a second opinion or would like to speak with a blood disorder specialist, please call The James Line at 800-293-5066 or 614-293-5066 to make an appointment.

Diagnosing Hemophilia

If you or your child have clotting issues or other bleeding problems, your doctor will examine you and ask you about your family medical history. Because hemophilia is an inherited disorder, two-thirds of patients receive it through parents’ genes.

The main way to diagnose hemophilia is with a blood test. Blood tests show how long it takes for your body’s blood to clot, how much of a protein called blood-clotting factor your body has and whether or not any blood-clotting factors are missing completely. 

Blood tests can also determine what type of hemophilia you have (Hemophilia A or Hemophilia B) and how severe it is. Knowing what kind of hemophilia you have is important because the OSUCCC – James hemophilia experts can design a targeted treatment plan for you based on your specific disorder and whether it is mild, moderate or severe.

(Source: National Institutes of Health)

The OSUCCC – James subspecialists determine mild, moderate and severe hemophilia classifications by the following:

  • Mild hemophilia: 5 to 40 percent normal blood-clotting factor is present in the body
  • Moderate hemophilia: 1 to 5 percent normal blood-clotting factor is present in the body
  • Severe hemophilia: less than 1 percent normal blood-clotting factor is present in the body

Hemophilia can cause serious bleeding problems in infants, and children with severe hemophilia are usually diagnosed within the first year of life. Some adults with milder forms of hemophilia may not be diagnosed until they’re adults.

Women who carry the hereditary marker for hemophilia can actually have the disorder diagnosed in utero (while the fetus is still in her uterus) as early as 12 weeks into their pregnancies.


If you’ve been diagnosed with hemophilia, would like a second opinion or would like to speak with a blood disorder specialist, please call The James Line at 800-293-5066 or 614-293-5066 to make an appointment.

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Patient Story

Patient Stories Mark Sulzman

Mark Sulzman

Born with severe hemophilia, Mark Sulzman sought out benign hematology experts at OSUCCC – James to help him manage the disorder with the most advanced treatments.

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