Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder. Because it’s a genetic condition someone is born with, there is no way to prevent the disease, so scientists are constantly investigating ways that the disease can be stopped before it passes to the next generation.

At the OSUCCC – James, a specialized sickle cell care team comprising expert researchers and medical specialists, continually focus on ways to prevent, diagnose, treat and cure blood diseases. In fact, the OSUCCC –James is consistently paving the way in leading-edge therapies and discoveries, leading to even more highly targeted care and treatment.

Couple that with world-renowned diagnostic experts and the most advanced diagnostic techniques to enable physicians to detect sickle cell anemia as early as possible, and patients are experiencing improved outcomes, faster responses to treatment and fewer side effects.

Screening for Sickle Cell Anemia 

Newborns in the United States are, by law, screened for sickle cell anemia at birth. The test uses the same blood samples used for other newborn tests.

Early diagnosis is important, because complications from the disease can arise early in life.
Using genetic testing, doctors can now diagnose sickle cell disease even before birth, as early as 10 weeks into pregnancy.

(Source: National Institutes of Health

If you’ve been diagnosed with sickle cell anemia, would like a second opinion or would like to speak with a blood disorder specialist, please call The James Line at 800-293-5066 or 614-293-5066 to make an appointment.

Risk Factors

Anything that increases the chances of having sickle cell anemia is a risk factor. Because it is an inherited disorder, it must be handed down through parents’ genes.

Those at risk for inheriting this genetic disease are mainly African Americans who have ancestors from: 

  • Africa
  • South or Central America (especially Panama)
  • Caribbean islands
  • Mediterranean countries (such as Turkey, Greece and Italy)
  • India
  • Saudi Arabia

Sickle cell disease is inherited when someone inherits mutated sickle cell genes from both parents. If, however, a person inherits a sickle cell gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other parent, it results in a condition called sickle cell trait (more than 2 million Americans have sickle cell trait). People with sickle cell trait do not have sickle cell anemia, but they are at high risk for passing along the gene to their children. 

For patients with a family history of sickle cell anemia, the OSUCCC - James offers genetic counseling

 

If you’ve been diagnosed with sickle cell anemia, would like a second opinion or would like to speak with a blood disorder specialist, please call The James Line at 800-293-5066 or 614-293-5066 to make an appointment.

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The James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute

460 West 10th Avenue

Columbus, Ohio 43210

800-293-5066 or 614-293-5066

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