A genome-wide association study meta-analysis of clinical fracture in 10,012 African American women.

Taylor KC, Evans DS, Edwards DRV, Edwards TL, Sofer T, Li G, Liu Y, Franceschini N, Jackson RD, Giri A, Donneyong M, Psaty B, Rotter JI, LaCroix AZ, Jordan JM, Robbins JA, Lewis B, Stefanick ML, Liu Y, Garcia M, Harris T, Cauley JA, North KE
Bone Rep 5 233-242 12/01/2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem associated with excess disability and mortality. It is estimated that 50-70% of the variation in osteoporotic fracture risk is attributable to genetic factors. The purpose of this hypothesis-generating study was to identify possible genetic determinants of fracture among African American (AA) women in a GWAS meta-analysis.

METHODS: Data on clinical fractures (all fractures except fingers, toes, face, skull or sternum) were analyzed among AA female participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) (N = 8155), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (N = 504), BioVU (N = 704), Health ABC (N = 651), and the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (JoCoOA) (N = 291). Affymetrix (WHI) and Illumina (Health ABC, JoCoOA, BioVU, CHS) GWAS panels were used for genotyping, and a 1:1 ratio of YRI:CEU HapMap haplotypes was used as an imputation reference panel. We used Cox proportional hazard models or logistic regression to evaluate the association of ~ 2.5 million SNPs with fracture risk, adjusting for ancestry, age, and geographic region where applicable. We conducted a fixed-effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis. Genome-wide significance was set at P < 5 × 10

RESULTS: One SNP, rs12775980 in an intron of

CONCLUSION: This GWAS meta-analysis of fractures in African American women identified a potentially novel locus in the supervillin gene, which encodes a platelet-associated factor and was previously associated with platelet thrombus formation in African Americans. If validated in other populations of African descent, these findings suggest potential new mechanisms involved in fracture that may be particularly important among African Americans.

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