A phase 1 clinical trial of single-agent selinexor in acute myeloid leukemia.

Garzon R, Savona M, Baz R, Andreeff M, Gabrail N, Gutierrez M, Savoie L, Mau-Sorensen M, Wagner-Johnston N, Yee K, Unger TJ, Saint-Martin JR, Carlson R, Rashal T, Kashyap T, Klebanov B, Shacham S, Kauffman M, Stone R, Garzon R, Savona M, Baz R, Andreeff M, Gabrail N, Gutierrez M, Savoie L, Mau-Sorensen PM, Wagner-Johnston N, Yee K, Unger TJ, Saint-Martin JR, Carlson R, Rashal T, Kashyap T, Klebanov B, Shacham S, Kauffman M, Stone R
Blood 129 3165-3174 06/15/2017

Abstract

Selinexor is a novel, first-in-class, selective inhibitor of nuclear export compound, which blocks exportin 1 (XPO1) function, leads to nuclear accumulation of tumor suppressor proteins, and induces cancer cell death. A phase 1 dose-escalation study was initiated to examine the safety and efficacy of selinexor in patients with advanced hematological malignancies. Ninety-five patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were enrolled between January 2013 and June 2014 to receive 4, 8, or 10 doses of selinexor in a 21- or 28-day cycle. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) in patients with AML were grade 1 or 2 constitutional and gastrointestinal toxicities, which were generally manageable with supportive care. The only nonhematological grade 3/4 AE, occurring in >5% of the patient population, was fatigue (14%). There were no reported dose-limiting toxicities or evidence of cumulative toxicity. The recommended phase 2 dose was established at 60 mg (~35 mg/m(2)) given twice weekly in a 4-week cycle based on the totality of safety and efficacy data. Overall, 14% of the 81 evaluable patients achieved an objective response (OR) and 31% percent showed =50% decrease in bone marrow blasts from baseline. Patients achieving an OR had a significant improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) (5.1 vs 1.3 months; P = .008; hazard ratio [HR], 3.1) and overall survival (9.7 vs 2.7 months; P = .01; HR, 3.1) compared with nonresponders. These findings suggest that selinexor is safe as a monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory AML and have informed subsequent phase 2 clinical development. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01607892.

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